Lord Of The Flies by William Golding

I have to admit every time I go about reading a classic, I worry that it will be – to be blunt – boring. Not because it was/is a bad or unimportant book, but because it might not be a timeless book, but more a revolution of its time. Or maybe it just isn’t for me. Luckily I am often wrong.

Lord of the Flies follows a group of boys stranded on an Island after a plane crash. We experience the boys’ attempt at a life away from civilization; making rules, appointing a chief, coming up with ways to find food and to find a chance of rescue.

It’s interesting to read through the boys left to their own devices in the face of trauma, and see how they handle it surprisingly well at first – considering their age – and then surprisingly bad – still considering their age.

We have a few characters playing men, and two trying wholeheartedly to be the “alpha”, causing the story to go from boys doing their best to survive to survival of the fittest and strength in numbers.

For me this story is about the “true nature of man”, when the boys are left on their own without any sign of consequence for them. This isn’t saying that the “true nature of man” is found in some of the horrific acts this book depicts, but merely the true nature of a boy having to become a man too soon. It shows a development of sin in innocence, and throughout the story we get to question, who’s beast and who’s man.


“The beast was harmless and horrible” – page 162

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